Article published in:
Germanic Heritage Languages in North America: Acquisition, attrition and change
Edited by Janne Bondi Johannessen † and Joseph C. Salmons
[Studies in Language Variation 18] 2015
► pp. 389405
Cited by

Cited by other publications

Johannessen, Janne Bondi & Signe Laake
2015.  In Germanic Heritage Languages in North America [Studies in Language Variation, 18],  pp. 299 ff. Crossref logo

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