Arabic in Contact

Editors
| CNRS, SeDyl
| University of Turin
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027201355 | EUR 105.00 | USD 158.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027263629 | EUR 105.00 | USD 158.00
 
The present volume provides an overview of current trends in the study of language contact involving Arabic. By drawing on the social factors that have converged to create different contact situations, it explores both contact-induced change in Arabic and language change through contact with Arabic. The volume brings together leading scholars who address a variety of topics related to contact-induced change, the emergence of contact languages, codeswitching, as well as language ideologies in contact situations. It offers insights from different theoretical approaches in connection with research fields such as descriptive and historical linguistics, sociolinguistics, ethnolinguistics, and language acquisition. It provides the general linguistic public with an updated, cutting edge overview and appreciation of themes and problems in Arabic linguistics and sociolinguists alike.
[Studies in Arabic Linguistics, 6]  2018.  vi, 372 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Arabic in contact, now and then
Stefano Manfredi and Mauro Tosco
2–17
The Arabic component in Domari
Bruno Herin
20–36
Syntactic outcomes of contact in Sason Arabic
Faruk Akkuș and Elabbas Benmamoun
38–52
Arabic-Berber-Songhay contact and the grammaticalisation of ‘thing’
Lameen Souag
54–71
Arabic and Berber in contact: Arabic in a minority situation in Al Hoceima region
Dominique Caubet
74–110
Arabic on the Dahlak islands (Eritrea)
Marie-Claude Simeone-Senelle
112–134
Ḥassāniyya Arabic in contact with Berber: The case of quadriliteral verbs
Catherine Taine-Cheikh
136–159
Loan verbs in Egyptian Arabic: Perspectives and evidence from social media
Ashraf F. Hassan
162–170
Phonetical and morphological remarks on the adaptation of Italian loanwords in Libyan Arabic
Luca D'Anna
172–187
An assessment of the Arabic lexical contribution to contemporary spoken Koalib
Nicolas Quint
190–205
Why linguistics needs an historically oriented Arabic linguistics
Jonathan Owens
208–232
Temporal adverbs of contrast in the Basic Variety of Arabic
Kees Versteegh
234–250
On the relationship between Arabic Foreigner Talk and Pidgin Arabic
Andrei A. Avram
251–273
Mountains do not meet, but men do: Music and sociocultural networks among Arabic creole-speaking communities across East Africa
Shuichiro Nakao
276–294
Determiner phrase: How specific is it in Moroccan Arabic-French codeswitching?
Karima Ziamari
296–311
From Arabia to Persia and back: Code-switching among the Āl ʿAlī tribe in the UAE and Iran
Dénes Gazsi
314–330
Arabic borrowing of the Hebrew word menahēl ‘manager’: Articulations and ideologies
Nancy Hawker
332–347
Contact-induced change from a speakers’ perspective: A study of language attitudes in Siwa
Valentina Serreli
350–368
“[L]inguistics in general can benefit from increased attention to Arabic and Arabic-related cases. Not only in the realms of pidgin and creole linguistics, [...], but also in studies of historical contact and theories of transmission or transfer. Indeed, this volume offers fascinating case studies related to Arabic to all of these fields, and it goes a significant way toward highlighting the importance of Arabic, understood as a complex collection of language varieties in highly varied sociolinguistic situations, for not only contact linguistics, but linguistics in general.”
Cited by

Cited by other publications

van Gelderen, Elly
2020.  In Perspectives on Arabic Linguistics XXXII [Studies in Arabic Linguistics, 9],  pp. 1 ff. Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 01 january 2021. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects
BIC Subject: CFF – Historical & comparative linguistics
BISAC Subject: LAN009010 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / Historical & Comparative
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2018019561 | Marc record