Article published in:
Narrative in ‘societies of intimates’
Edited by Lesley Stirling, Jennifer Green, Tania Strahan and Susan Douglas
[Narrative Inquiry 26:2] 2016
► pp. 217256
References

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Cited by

Cited by 3 other publications

Green, Jennifer
2016. Multimodal complexity in sand story narratives. Narrative Inquiry 26:2  pp. 312 ff. Crossref logo
Hill, Clair
2016. Expression of the interpersonal connection between narrators and characters in Umpila and Kuuku Ya’u storytelling. Narrative Inquiry 26:2  pp. 257 ff. Crossref logo
Strahan, Tania & Lesley Stirling
2016. “What the hell was in that wine?”. Narrative Inquiry 26:2  pp. 430 ff. Crossref logo

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