Assessing L2 Listening

Moving towards authenticity

| Iowa State University
| Temple University
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027201270 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
PaperbackAvailable
ISBN 9789027201263 | EUR 36.00 | USD 54.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027263636 | EUR 99.00/36.00*
| USD 149.00/54.00*
 
This book is relevant for language testers, listening researchers, and oral proficiency teachers, in that it explores four broad themes related to the assessment of L2 listening ability: the use of authentic, real-world spoken texts; the effects of different speech varieties of listening inputs; the use of audio-visual texts; and assessing listening as part of an interactive speaking/listening construct. Each theme is introduced with a review of the relevant literature, and then is examined through either two or three empirical studies. The notion of authenticity underlies each of these four themes. By creating more authentic test tasks that are similar to real world language tasks, test developers can create listening assessments that not only more effectively assess test takers’ communicative competence, but can also have a positive washback effect on educational systems.
[Language Learning & Language Teaching, 50]  2018.  xvii, 278 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Acknowledgments
xvii
Preface
xii–xvi
Chapter 1. Introduction
Gary J. Ockey and Elvis Wagner
2–10
Section I. The use of authentic, real-world spoken texts on L2 listening tests
14–63
Chapter 2. An overview of the use of authentic, real-world spoken texts on L2 listening tests
Elvis Wagner and Gary J. Ockey
14–28
Chapter 3. A comparison of L2 listening performance on tests with scripted or authenticated spoken texts
Elvis Wagner
30–43
Chapter 4. Connected-speech dictations for testing listening
James Dean Brown and Jonathan Trace
46–63
Section II. Using different types of speech varieties as listening inputs in L2 listening assessment
68–126
Chapter 5. An overview of the issue of using different types of speech varieties as listening inputs in L2 listening assessment
Gary J. Ockey and Elvis Wagner
68–81
Chapter 6. Reliability and sources of score variance in a strength of accent measure
Gary J. Ockey
84–95
Chapter 7. Listening to an unfamiliar accent: Exploring difficulty, strategy use, and evidence of adaptation on listening assessment tasks
Luke Harding
98–112
Chapter 8. Different varieties of World Englishes: Perceptual judgments and speech characteristics
Okim Kang and Meghan Moran Wilson
114–126
Section III. The use of audio-visual texts on L2 listening tests
130–175
Chapter 9. An overview of the use of audio-visual texts on L2 listening tests
Elvis Wagner and Gary J. Ockey
130–144
Chapter 10. Test takers’ use of visual information in an L2 video-mediated listening test: Evidence from cued retrospective reporting
Ruslan Suvorov
146–160
Chapter 11. Investigating the impact of nonverbal communication cues on listening item types
Aaron Olaf Batty
162–175
Section IV. Interactive listening as part of the construct of interactive and integrated oral test tasks
180–256
Chapter 12. An overview of interactive listening as part of the construct of interactive and integrated oral test tasks
Gary J. Ockey and Elvis Wagner
180–192
Chapter 13. The degree to which it matters if an oral test task requires listening
Gary J. Ockey
194–204
Chapter 14. Investigating examiner interventions in relation to the listening demands they make on candidates in oral interview tests
Fumiyo Nakatsuhara
206–225
Chapter 15. A measurement model for listen-speak tasks
Ikkyu Choi and Youngsoon So
228–245
Chapter 16. Conclusion
Elvis Wagner and Gary J. Ockey
248–256
References
257–273
Index
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This list is based on CrossRef data as of 06 january 2021. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects
BIC Subject: CJA – Language teaching theory & methods
BISAC Subject: LAN020000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Study & Teaching
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2018018983 | Marc record