From Interaction to Symbol

A systems view of the evolution of signs and communication

HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027243447 | EUR 105.00 | USD 158.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027288905 | EUR 105.00 | USD 158.00
 
Against the background of jargon-ridden and often obscure semiotic literature Sadowski’s book offers a reader-friendly yet rigorous account of human communication and its evolution from animal and primate behaviour. What is specifically human about the way we exchange information with other people, and to what extent are our facial expressions, body language, and even emotive elements of speech still indebted to our pre-human ancestors? Why can the chimpanzees, smart as they are, not interpret animal tracks in the ground; why did religions often ban representational art; why is photography perceptually more powerful than painting; how have human syntactic speech and combinatorial grammar enabled the “explosion” of culture; and why do otherwise rational humans often strongly believe in the objective existence of unempirical, virtual entities such as religious and philosophic concepts? These and many other fascinating questions are addressed in the book within the methodological framework of systems theory and evolutionary psychology.
[Iconicity in Language and Literature, 8]  2009.  xxi, 300 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
List of figures
xi
Acknowledgements
xiii
Preface
xv–xxi
Chapter 1. Systems theory: Between philosophy and science, but more science than philosophy
1–24
Chapter 2. Towards a systems model of communication
25–70
Chapter 3. Needs as motivators of behaviour
71–90
Chapter 4. From emotive vocalizations to bodily adornments: The origins of referentiality
91–122
Chapter 5. Photography, or the magic of iconic indexicality
123–144
Chapter 6. Photography plus movement, or even more magic
145–160
Chapter 7. From mimicry to metaphor: The origins of art
161–182
Chapter 9. The thrills of visual realism
183–206
Chapter 10. Linguistic iconicity and the limits of arbitrariness
207–230
Chapter 11. The origins of language and the advantages of arbitrariness
231–256
Chapter 12. Language and the symbolic compulsion
257–280
References
281–296
Index
297–300
Cited by

Cited by 6 other publications

Chang, Melanie L. & April Nowell
2020.  In Archaeologies of the Heart,  pp. 205 ff. Crossref logo
Flaksman, Maria
2020.  In Operationalizing Iconicity [Iconicity in Language and Literature, 17],  pp. 76 ff. Crossref logo
Mooijer, Hans
2011. Interactivity and Its Effects on Iconicity in Digital Environments: The Case of Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland in Gregory Weir’s Reading Game Silent Conversation. SSRN Electronic Journal Crossref logo
Ogourtsova, V. S. 
2017. The Border between Reality and Fantasy in the Works of N. V. Gogol and V. I. Dal. Izvestiya of Saratov University. New Series. Series: Philology. Journalism 17:4  pp. 413 ff. Crossref logo
Sadowski, Piotr
2020.  In Operationalizing Iconicity [Iconicity in Language and Literature, 17],  pp. 232 ff. Crossref logo
Wijngaards, Aloys & Esther-Mirjam Sent
2012. Meaning of Life: Exploring the Relation between Economics and Religion. Review of Social Economy 70:1  pp. 109 ff. Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 07 february 2021. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects

Communication Studies

Communication Studies

Philosophy

Philosophy
BIC Subject: CFG – Semantics, Pragmatics, Discourse Analysis
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2009028547 | Marc record