History of the Literary Cultures of East-Central Europe

Junctures and disjunctures in the 19th and 20th centuries

Volume IV: Types and stereotypes

Editors
| Virginia Commonwealth University
| University of Amsterdam
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027234582 | EUR 198.00 | USD 297.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027287861 | EUR 198.00 | USD 297.00
 
Types and stereotypes is the fourth and last volume of a path-breaking multinational literary history that incorporates innovative features relevant to the writing of literary history in general. Instead of offering a traditional chronological narrative of the period 1800-1989, the History of the Literary Cultures of East-Central Europe approaches the region’s literatures from five complementary angles, focusing on literature’s participation in and reaction to key political events, literary periods and genres, the literatures of cities and sub-regions, literary institutions, and figures of representation. The main objective of the project is to challenge the self-enclosure of national literatures in traditional literary histories, to contextualize them in a regional perspective, and to recover individual works, writers, and minority literatures that national histories have marginalized or ignored.
Types and stereotypes brings together articles that rethink the figures of National Poets, figurations of the Family, Women, Outlaws, and Others, as well as figures of Trauma and Mediation. As in the previous three volumes, the historical and imaginary figures discussed here constantly change and readjust to new political and social conditions. An Epilogue complements the basic history, focusing on the contradictory transformations of East-Central European literary cultures after 1989. This volume will be of interest to the region’s literary historians, to students and teachers of comparative literature, to cultural historians, and to the general public interested in exploring the literatures of a rich and resourceful cultural region.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Acknowledgements
ix
List of illustrations
xi
General Introduction
John Neubauer and Marcel Cornis-Pope
1–9
Figures of national poets
Introduction
John Neubauer
11–18
Adam Mickiewicz as a Polish National Icon
Roman Koropeckyj
19–39
Petofi: Self-Fashioning, Consecration, Dismantling
John Neubauer
40–55
Mácha, the Czech National Poet
Robert B. Pynsent
56–85
Mihai Eminescu: The Foundational Truth of a Dual Lyre
Calin-Andrei Mihailescu
86–96
France Prešeren: A Conquest of the Slovene Parnassus
Marijan Dovic
97–109
Petar II Petrovic Njegoš: The Icon of the Poet with the Icon
Svetlana Slapšak
110–116
Hristo Botev and the Necessity of National Icons
Boyko Pencev
117–127
Bialik, Poet of the People
Dvir Abramovich
128–132
Figurations of the family
Introduction
John Neubauer
133–139
Family Trauma and Domestic Violence in Twentieth-Century Estonian Literature
Tiina Kirss
140–153
In Search of the Mother’s Voice: The Diary of Milica Stojadinovic Srpkinja
Biljana Dojcinovic-Nešic
154–166
Daughter Figures in Latvian Women’s Autobiographical Writing of the 1990s
Sandra Mešková
167–175
Figuring the Motherland and Staging the Party Father in Bulgarian Literature
Inna Peleva and Joanna Spassova-Dikova
176–182
Gendering the Body of the Lithuanian Nation in Maironis’s Poetry
Arturas Tereskinas
183–192
František Palacký, the Father Figure of Czech Historiography and Nation Building
Tamás Berkes
193–210
Miloš Crnjanski’s Homecoming to a Migrating National Family
Miro Mašek
211–219
Figures of female identity
Introduction
Marcel Cornis-Pope, Robert B. Pynsent and John Neubauer
221–227
Women at the Foundation of Romanian Literary Culture: From Muse to Writing Agent
Marcel Cornis-Pope
229–240
Constructing a Woman Author within the Literary Canon: Aspazija and Anna Brigadere
Sandra Mešková
241–251
Gender and War in South Slavic Literatures
Jasmina Lukić
253–260
Women’s Memory and an Alternative Kosovo Myth
Svetlana Slapšak
261–269
Women’s Corpuses, Corpses or (Cultural) Bodies: The Example of Croatian Theater
Lada Cale Feldman
271–280
Berta Bojetu-Boeta’s Feminist Dystopias
Metka Zupancic
281–287
Figures of the Other
Introduction
John Neubauer
289–295
How Did the Golem Get to Prague?
John Neubauer
296–307
How Did the Golems (and Robots) Enter Stage and Screen and Leave Prague?
Veronika Ambros
308–320
Vámbéry, Stoker, and Dracula: Export of Anxiety from East to West
Péter Krasztev
321–332
Lasting Legacies: Vlad Ţepes and Dracula in Romanian National Discourse
Nárcisz Fejes
333–343
Czech Feminist Anti-Semitism: The Case of Bozena Benešová
Robert B. Pynsent
344–366
Figuring the Other in Nineteenth-Century Czech Literature: Gabriela Preissová and Bozena Viková-Kunetická
Iveta Jusová
367–377
Killing with Metaphors: Romani in the Literary Imagination of East-Central Europe
Mihaela Moscaliuc
378–390
Love, Magic, and Life: Gypsies in Yugoslav Cinema
Nevena Daković
391–401
The Alienated and Uprooted Tlushim
Dvir Abramovich
402–406
Figures of outlaws
The Rural Outlaws of East-Central Europe
Joep Leerssen, John Neubauer, Marcel Cornis-Pope, Dragan Klaić and Biljana Markovic
407–440
Juraj Jánošík
Ute Rassloff
441–456
Shifting Images of the Bulgarian Haiduti
Elka Agoston-Nikolova
457–460
Figures of trauma
Introduction
John Neubauer
461–462
Remembrances of the Past and the Present
Nevena Daković
463–477
‘Goli Otok’ Literature
Lado Kralj
478–483
Traumas of World War II: Polish and Hungarian Literature
Jolanta Jastrzebska
484–503
Performing Identity: Lithuanian Memoirs of Siberian Deportation and Exile
Jura Avizienis
504–514
Figures of mediation
Introduction
John Neubauer
515–520
Joseph Eötvös
Gábor Gángó
521–526
On the Ethnic Border: Images of Slovaks in the Writings of some Hungarian Modernists
Péter Hajdú
527–538
Two Regionalists of the Interwar Period: Józef Mackiewicz and Mária Berde
John Neubauer and Włodimierz Bolecki
539–548
Journeys to the Other Half of the Continent: British and Irish Accounts of the Carpatho-Danubian Region
Pia Brînzeu
549–560
Epilogue
East-Central European Literature after 1989
Marcel Cornis-Pope
561–630
Works cited
631–693
Index
695–705
List of Contributors to Volume 4
707–708
Errata for volumes 1-3
709–714
“This monumental history of ECE literary cultures is both an authoritative account of these cultures and an ingenious prod to their further investigation. It is composed of learned, erudite, and vastly informative essays of the highest standard, many of which make distinct contributions to scholarship and criticism. The idiosyncratic and even quirky dynamics of the literary cultures of East Central Europe receive their due, and serve as the organizing principles of these four volumes. The reader will find a large variety of approaches and styles, and will be grateful to the editors for insuring clarity of expression throughout. This history is both a work of reference and an endless source of discovery.”
“The editors of this volume, Marcel Cornis-Pope and John Neubauer have meticulously organized the collective comments and interactions of a broad cadré of international scholars thereby offering lucid and candid perspectives on key literary phenomena. Due to the consortium of international scholars contributing to these four volumes, we now have detailed insights into the extraordinary deprivations and remarkable achievements of this region.”
“H.L.C.E.C.E. successfully responds to and embraces emergent theoretical and practical approaches to writing literary history by recognizing the multiple complexities of voice that arose in Twentieth Century literature. [...] The editors of this volume, Marcel Cornis-Pope and John Neubauer have meticulously organized the collective comments and interactions of a broad cadré of international scholars thereby offering lucid and candid perspectives on key literary phenomena. Due to the consortium of international scholars contributing to these four volumes, we now have detailed insights into the extraordinary deprivations and remarkable achievements of this region. ”
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2016.  In Or Words to That Effect [Comparative History of Literatures in European Languages, XXVIII], Crossref logo
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2020. East-Central Europe in comparative literature studies: introduction. Neohelicon 47:2  pp. 595 ff. Crossref logo
Hibbitt, Richard
2017.  In Other Capitals of the Nineteenth Century,  pp. 1 ff. Crossref logo
Ifrim, Nicoleta
2013. Perspectives on Identity in Romanian Post-Totalitarian Criticism: Adrian Marino and his Pro-European ‘Third Discourse’. Romance Studies 31:1  pp. 26 ff. Crossref logo
López-Varela Azcárate, Asunción
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This list is based on CrossRef data as of 07 january 2021. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects
BIC Subject: DSA – Literary theory
BISAC Subject: LIT004110 – LITERARY CRITICISM / European / Eastern
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2004041186 | Marc record