History of the Literary Cultures of East-Central Europe

Junctures and disjunctures in the 19th and 20th centuries

Volume III: The making and remaking of literary institutions

Editors
| Virginia Commonwealth University
| University of Amsterdam
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027234551 | EUR 190.00 | USD 285.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027292353 | EUR 190.00 | USD 285.00
 
The third volume in the History of the Literary Cultures of East-Central Europe focuses on the making and remaking of those institutional structures that engender and regulate the creation, distribution, and reception of literature. The focus here is not so much on shared institutions but rather on such region-wide analogous institutional processes as the national awakening, the modernist opening, and the communist regimentation, the canonization of texts, and censorship of literature. These processes, which took place in all of the region’s cultures, were often asynchronous and subjected to different local conditions. The volume’s premise is that the national awakening and institutionalization of literature were symbiotically interrelated in East-Central Europe. Each national awakening involves a language renewal, an introduction of the vernacular and its literature in schools and universities, the creation of an infrastructure for the publication of books and journals, clashes with censorship, the founding of national academies, libraries, and theaters, a (re)construction of national folklore, and the writing of histories of the vernacular literature. The four parts of this volume are titled: (1) Publishing and Censorship, (2) Theater as a Literary Institution, (3) Forging Primal Pasts: The Uses of Folk Poetry, and (4) Literary Histories: Itineraries of National Self-images.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
PREFACE
ix–xii
LIST OF VISUAL MATERIALS
xiii
GENERAL INTRODUCTION
John Neubauer, Inna Peleva and Mihály Szegedy-Maszák
1–38
Part I. PUBLISHING AND CENSORSHIP
39–142
Introduction
John Neubauer, Robert B. Pynsent, Vilmos Voigt and Marcel Cornis-Pope
39
1. Publishing
63–94
The Cosmopolitanism of Moderní revue (1894–1925)
Neil Stewart
63
The Uncompromising Standards of Nyugat (1908–1941)
József Szili
70
A Contest within Romanian Modernism: Sburătorul vs. Gândirea
Marcel Cornis-Pope
80
Krugovi : A Croatian Opening (1952–58)
Tomislav Brlek
84
Underground Publishing in Estonia under Soviet Censorship
Kersti Unt
86
Slovak Journals between Languages and against Censorship
Dagmar Roberts
89
The National Role of the Albanian Literary Journals
Robert Elsie
92
2. Censorship
95–142
The Laws and Practices of Censorship in Bohemia
Jan Čulík
95
Censorship: A Case Study of Bohumil Hrabal’s Jarmilka
Kees Mercks
101
Religious and Political Censorship in Slovakia
Dagmar Roberts
111
The Introduction of Communist Censorship in Hungary 1945–49)
Mihály Szegedy-Maszák
114
Strategies against Censorship in Soviet Lithuania (1944–90)
Violeta Kelertas
125
Getting Around Polish Censorship: 1968–89
Włodimierz Bolecki
135
Censorship after Independence: the Case of Aleksander Pelēcis
Karl E. Jirgens
138
Part II. THEATER AS A LITERARY INSTITUTION
143–268
General Introduction
Dragan Klaić
143
1. Professionalization and Institutionalization in the Service of a National Awakening
147–169
Introduction
Dragan Klaić
147
Building a(s) Theater: the Pesti Magyar Színház in 1837
Zoltán Imre
149
Slovenia: from Jesuit Performance to Opera
Lado Kralj
153
Czech Theater: A Paradoxical Prop of the National Revival
Ondřej Hučín
154
Slovakia: Theater Starts as an Amateur Endeavor
Dagmar Roberts
158
Polish Drama Sustains Spiritual Unity in a Divided Country
Monika Adamczyk-Garbowska
159
Lithuania: School, Court, and Clandestine Performances
Audroné Girdzijauskaitė
162
Politics and Artistic Autonomy in Estonian Theater
Jaak Rähesoo
163
Theater Speaks Many Languages in Romania
Marian Popescu
166
From the Čitališta to the National Theater in Bulgaria
Joanna Spassova-Dikova
167
2. Modernism: the Director Rules
171–216
Introduction
Dragan Klaić
171
The European Horizons of Stjepan Miletić
Nikola Batusić
173
Reform within: the Thália Társaság 1904–1908
Zoltán Imre
176
Modernist Inroads into Czech Theater
Ondřej Hučín
178
Fuzzy Borderlines: the Čapeks’ Robots, Insects, Women, and Men
Veronika Ambros
183
The Interbellum Emancipation of the Slovak Stage
Dagmar Roberts
189
Cosmopolitanism and Nationalism Clash on the Romanian Stage
Marian Popescu and Marcel Cornis-Pope
191
Institutionalization and Innovation in the Bulgarian Theater
Joanna Spassova-Dikova
192
Polish Modernist Drama
Ewa Wąchocka
196
Stage and Stage Design in Polish Modernist Theater
Eleonora Udalska and Violetta Sajkievic
199
Popular Amusement and Avant-garde in the Polish Cabaret
Dorota Fox
203
Yiddish Theater
Michael Steinlauf
205
The Stage in Independent Lithuania
Audroné Girdzijauskaitė
210
Kicking with Poetry: Female Trailblazers on the Latvian Stage
Banuta Rubess
211
The Ebbs and Flows of Modernist Energy in Estonian Theater
Jaak Rähesoo
213
Branko Gavella: The Director as Thinker
Sibila Petlevski
215
3. Theater under Socialism
217–268
Introduction
Dragan Klaić
217
The Short Interlude of a Liberal Czech Theater
Libor Vodička
221
Slovak Drama: Reconciling the Absurd with Socialism
Dagmar Roberts
226
Communism and After in Romanian Theater
Marian Popescu
227
Mandatory Socialist Models vs. Stylist Eclecticism on the Bulgarian Stage
Joanna Spassova-Dikova
228
Enver-Hoxha Dictatorship Stifles Albanian Theater
Robert Elsie
231
From Provincial Backwaters to Budapest and World Reputation
László Bérczes
234
After Witkacy and Gombrowicz: Faces of Postwar-Polish Drama
Ewa Wąchocka
238
Wyspiański’s Offsprings
Eleonora Udalska
241
The Visual Richness of the Polish Stage
Violetta Sajkiewicz
243
Independence Brings International Recognition to Lithuanian Directors
Audroné Girdzijauskaitė
245
Estonian Theater Loosens the Soviet Straightjacket
Jaak Rähesoo
247
Ideological Critique and Moral Rectitude in Slovene Dramas
Lado Kralj
250
Ingenious Dramatic Strategies Reach across the Yugoslav Theater Space
Aleksandra Jovićević
257
Epilogue: After Socialism
Dragan Klaić
265
Part III. FORGING PRIMAL PASTS: THE USES OF FOLKLORE
269–343
Introduction: Folklore and National Awakening
John Neubauer and Marcel Cornis-Pope
269
Levels of Institutionalization in Estonian Folklore
Ülo Valk
285
Mythologizing Contemporary Baltic Consciousness
Endre Bojtar
290
National and International Traits in the Latvian Trickster Velns
Karl E. Jirgens
295
The Ideal of Folk Culture in the Literature of the Czech National Rebirth
Tamás Berkes
298
Folklore in the Making of Slovak Literature
Dagmar Roberts
310
The Question of Folklore in Romanian Literary Culture
Marcel Cornis-Pope and Otilia Hedeşan
314
The Heidenrösleinkrawall (The Row about the Wild Roses): an 1864 Debate on the Origins of Folk Ballads
Vilmos Voigt
323
Folklore as a Means to Demonstrate a Nation’s Existence: The Bulgarian Case
Albena Hranova and Alexander Kiossev
325
The Rediscovery of Folk Literature in Albania
Robert Elsie
335
“Sons of Black Death”: The Semantics of Foreignness in Twentieth-Century Bulgarian and Macedonian Writings
Jolanta Sujecka
338
Part IV. LITERARY HISTORIES AND TEXTBOOKS
345–427
Introduction
John Neubauer
345
Shifting Ideologies in Estonia’s Literary Histories, Textbooks, and Anthologies
Epp Annus, Luule Epner and Juri Talvet
355
Latvian Literary Histories and Textbooks
Agita Misāne
359
Sorrows and Glories of a Nation’s Soul: Polish Literary Histories
Jolanta Jastrzebska
361
Nineteenth-Century Czech Literary History, National Revival, and the Forged Manuscripts
Robert B. Pynsent
366
Overcoming Czech and Hungarian Perspectives in Writing Slovak Literary Histories
Dagmar Roberts
377
The Narrowing Scope of Hungarian Literary Histories
John Neubauer
384
The Career of Latecomers: Romanian Literary Histories
Monica Spiridon
392
Conceiving of a Croatian Literary Canon, 1900–50
Nenad Ivić
395
Serbia: the Widening Rift between Criticism and Literary Histories
Svetlana Slapšak, Guido Snel and John Neubauer
404
Albanian Literary History: A Communist Primeur
Robert Elsie
409
National Identity and Textbooks of Literary History: the Case of Bulgaria
Alexander Kiossev
411
Pitfalls in Writing a Regional Literary History of East-Central Europe
Endre Bojtar
419
WORKS CITED
429
APPENDIX
491
List of Contributors
491
Table of Contents, Vol. 1
495
Table of Contents, Vol. 2
499
Gazetteer
503
INDEX of East-Central European Names
505
“These [...] constitute an unmistakable cultural and literary-historical document in the catalogue of contemporary Europe.”
“This collection of essays marks a significant departure from traditional modes of cultural scholarship. [...] This collection of inter-connected essays is highly successful in re-articulating the history of East-Central European literatures by considering the various 'nodal' points through consistent comparative principles. [...] This study will prove highly worthy not only to those who are interested in East-Central European culture, but also those who seek scholarly and analytic alternatives to exclusionary and hegemonic approaches to the understanding of literature. This volume features a refreshing, pragmatic and enlightened methodology that interprets and illuminates regional cultural developments while recognizing the transformative effects of the larger regional and global milieu.”
“The volume's four parts [...] offer a thorough examination that leaves out any possibility of exclusions from a vast pantheon of literary institutions in East-Central Europe over the last two centuries. [...] One can only imagine the tremendous amount of research and selection that informs the long list of literary institutions profiled in the volume's insightful and judiciously chosen commentaries attachted to a particular culture, event, or literary development.”
The History of the Literary Cultures of East-Central Europe is, in more ways than one, an exceptional publication. The project's range and the diversity of the topis covered are impressive. The informative value of the articles collected therein is immense. The authors of the essays remind us of the role of the East-Central European writers in the world literary canon. Lastly, the History of the Literary Cultures may well turn out to be a priceless scholarly inspiration, proving the nearly limitless possibilities of comparative criticism.”
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Hajdu, Péter
2020. East-Central Europe in comparative literature studies: introduction. Neohelicon 47:2  pp. 595 ff. Crossref logo
Kalnačs, Benedikts
2016. Comparing colonial differences: Baltic literary cultures as agencies of Europe’s internal others. Journal of Baltic Studies 47:1  pp. 15 ff. Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 07 january 2021. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects
BIC Subject: DSBH – Literary studies: from c 1900 -
BISAC Subject: LIT004110 – LITERARY CRITICISM / European / Eastern
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2004041186 | Marc record