True Emotions

| University of Helsinki
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027241597 | EUR 90.00 | USD 135.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027269812 | EUR 90.00 | USD 135.00
 

True Emotions discusses several key problems in emotion research. The question about the true nature of emotions focuses on the role of cognition in human emotions at different levels of analysis: functional role, types of processes and representations, and neural implementation. Truth to the self, or authenticity, has two meanings, psychological and normative, where the latter is analyzed as coherence between the evaluative content of an emotion and the subject’s internally justified beliefs and values. Truth to the world is argued to be a matter of correct evaluative representation of the emotional object on the one hand, and the existence of the object, or the actuality or accurate probability of the represented situation on the other hand. Finally, authenticity and truth are applied to analyses of the authenticity of occupational emotions and the constitution of sentimental values, respectively. Recommended reading for philosophers, psychologists, sociologists, and gender researchers.

[Consciousness & Emotion Book Series, 9]  2014.  ix, 191 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Acknowledgements
ix–X
Chapter 1. Introduction
1–14
Chapter 2. Cognition in the structure of emotion
15–44
Chapter 3. Cognition in the dynamics of emotion
45–74
Chapter 4. Emotional authenticity
75–104
Chapter 5. Emotional truth
105–124
Chapter 6. Authenticity and occupational emotions
125–142
Chapter 7. From true emotions to sentimental values
143–166
Chapter 8. Concluding remarks
167–172
References
173–186
Index names
187–188
Index terms
189–192
“Salmela, as he can do so brilliantly, sees human emotions as a philosophical problem to be solved. This book will make readers think.”
“[E]nriching, thought provoking and very well documented. The question of the emotions' authenticity is addressed thoroughly.”
References

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Consciousness Research

Consciousness research

Philosophy

Philosophy
BIC Subject: JMQ – Psychology: emotions
BISAC Subject: PSY013000 – PSYCHOLOGY / Emotions
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2014016853 | Marc record