A World Atlas of Translation

Editors
| University of Turku & Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University
| European Commission, Brussels
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027202154 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027262967 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
What do people think of translation in the different historical, cultural and linguistic traditions of the world? How many uses has translation been put to? How distant from one another are the concepts of translation found in the different traditions? These are some of the questions A World Atlas of Translation addresses. Its twenty-one reports give us pictures taken from the inside, both from traditions that are well represented in the literature and from the many that (for now) are not.

But the Atlas is not content with documenting – no map is this innocent. In fact, the wealth of information collected and made accessible by its reporters can be useful to gauge the dispersion of translation concepts across traditions. As you read its reports, the Atlas will keep asking “How far apart do these concepts look to you?” Finally and more ambitiously, the reports can help us test the hypothesis that a cross-cultural notion of translation exists. In this respect, the Atlas is mostly a proof of concept. It hopes to encourage further fact-based research in quest of a robust and compelling unifying notion of translation.
[Benjamins Translation Library, 145]  2019.  vii, 493 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Preface
1–12
Chapter 1. Translating in the Pacific: Rendering the Christian Bible in the islanders’ tongues
Joseph P. Hong
13–38
Chapter 2. Recent tradition in Australia
Adolfo Gentile
39–54
Chapter 3. Japanese conceptualizations of ‘translation’
Judy Wakabayashi
55–80
Chapter 4. Contemporary views of translation in China
Leo Tak-hung Chan
81–104
Chapter 5. From plagiarism to incense sticks: The making of self and the other in Thai translation history
Phrae Chittiphalangsri
105–124
Chapter 6. More or less “translation”: Landscapes of language and communication in India
Rita Kothari and Krupa Shah
125–148
Chapter 7. The Persian tradition
Omid Azadibougar and Esmaeil Haddadian-Moghaddam
149–168
Chapter 8. The notion of translation in the Arab world: A critical developmental perspective
Salah Basalamah
169–192
Chapter 9. Traditions of translation in Hebrew culture
Nitsa Ben-Ari and Shaul Levin
193–214
Chapter 10. Altaic tradition: Turkey
Cemal Demircioğlu
215–242
Chapter 11. Translation tradition throughout South African history
Maricel Botha and Anne-Marie Beukes
243–270
Chapter 12. Translation traditions in Angola
Riikka Halme-Berneking
271–286
Chapter 13. The culture(s) of translation in Russia
Brian James Baer and Sergey Tyulenev
287–308
Chapter 14. The concept of translation in Slavic cultures
Zuzana Jettmarová
309–322
Chapter 15. The Greek-speaking tradition
Simos Grammenidis and Georgios Floros
323–340
Chapter 16. Latin/Romance tradition
Lieven D’hulst
341–354
Chapter 17. Germanic tradition
Gauti Kristmannsson
355–374
Chapter 18. Hispanic South America
Álvaro Echeverri and Georges L. Bastin
375–394
Chapter 19. The history of translation in Brazil through the centuries: In search of a tradition
Dennys Silva-Reis and John Milton
395–418
Chapter 20. Translation in Central America and Mexico
Nayelli Castro
419–442
Chapter 21. Translation and North America: A reframing
María Constanza Guzmán and Lyse Hébert
443–464
Postface
465–470
Bio-notes
471–480
Index of Languages, people, toponyms
481–484
Name index
485–490
Subject index
491–493
“Cet ouvrage présente un intérêt certain pour les historiens de la linguistique par la qualité de la réflexion sur la traduction et par la richesse des données et des références que comportent chacun des rapports.”
“Se trata de una obra muy rica en su contenido. Obviamente, no todo el contenido es nuevo para los especialistas de la traducción, pero resulta evidente que no se podían dejar de lado las tradiciones más conocidas como las europeas y norteamericanas, así como las de ciertos países latinoamericanos como México y Brasil, y de algunos países asiáticos como Japón, China o India. Se nos hizo muy refrescante leer sobre traducción en regiones como el Pacífico Sur, Centroamérica y África en general, y sobre países como Angola, Australia, Belice o Tailandia, en particular.”
Cited by

Cited by 2 other publications

Gambier, Yves
2018.  In A History of Modern Translation Knowledge [Benjamins Translation Library, 142],  pp. 19 ff. Crossref logo
Gambier, Yves & Ramunė Kasperavičienė
2021. Changing translation practices and moving boundaries in translation studies. Babel. Revue internationale de la traduction / International Journal of Translation 67:1 Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 06 march 2021. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects

Translation & Interpreting Studies

Translation Studies
BIC Subject: CFP – Translation & interpretation
BISAC Subject: LAN023000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Translating & Interpreting
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2018046313 | Marc record